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NASA at Home Launches To Expand Your Mind and Keep Your Kids Busy

2 min read
Mar 30, 2020

It's not often that the launch of a scientific and educational website has a direct meaning for your business. This is one of those times. NASA has posted many of their free videos, books, and educational materials in one place. For those who are juggling work, parenting, and the combined stress of both, online materials like this could be a lifesaver.

For example, what better way to keep kids busy than having them design and build a vehicle to keep marshmallow "astronauts" safe? Younger kids won’t be left out. Videos such as Elmo interviewing an astronaut should keep the little ones happy. For those trying to work from home, try taking a break with an ebook full of stunning photos of Saturn, its rings, and its moons – guaranteed to take your mind far away from that stressful Zoom meeting.

Staying productive has never been this hard. A poorly designed open office can't compete with the disruptive force of a bored kid trying to ride a surprisingly patient golden retriever. Sadly, many parents haven't received resources from schools to help. They are left alone to figure out how to successfully juggle homeschooling and home office. Even for those without kids, staying positive and focused is hard. Experts warn that mental health problems could increase solely because of social isolation.

Luckily, NASA at Home is just one of many options to keep your mind focused on other things.  For kids and teenagers, Khan Academy has helpfully posted full school schedules for kids from ages 2 to 18, complete with videos and lesson plans. For adults, learning something new has never been easier. Free classes are available from edX, for example, and affordable ones on sites such as Udemy and LinkedIn Learning. Sure you could just watch another episode of Love is Blind to unwind, but maybe something more challenging could stimulate those neurons dulled by social distancing. Cooped up inside, there's no better time to let your imagination wander above the clouds. Those marshmallow astronauts won't save themselves.